More Than Just Metal | A Closer Look At The Materials Used For Metal Roofing

3 August 2017
 Categories: Construction & Contractors, Blog


With an upstanding reputation of longevity, resilience, and lower costs than some other roofing materials, most homeowners will immediately say they want metal roofing when it is time for a replacement. However, just heading to the local supplier and saying you want metal roofing will not yield you a small selection of color and design choices; you will actually be faced with a large array of different types of metal roofing. The fact is, metal roofing can be made from a broad range of metal types. To better prepare yourself to choose the proper type of metal roofing for your home, it is best to get familiar with some of the most popular options. 

Galvanized Steel Metal Roofing 

Perhaps one of the most popular choices, galvanized steel metal roofing is available in an array of colors and from a wide range of metal roofing manufacturers. Galvanized steel has a good reputation for its strength and does hold up well in most settings. Galvanized steel is basically steel that has been coated with other alloys, like zinc and aluminum. Even though galvanized steel roofing is a popular choice, it does not always fare well in coastal regions because corrosion due to salt content in the atmosphere can be a big problem. 

Aluminum Metal Roofing 

Second in line is aluminum metal roofing. Metal roofing created from aluminum may sound like it is lightweight and less durable, but this is definitely not the case. Aluminum roofing tends to last very well and hold its finish even in coastal areas or areas that receive a great deal of precipitation. Because aluminum is a less costly material than many forms of steel, aluminum roofing is often thought of as a less expensive alternative that can offer basically the same advantages. 

Copper Metal Roofing 

If you are going for longevity and unique beauty with your roofing choice, copper metal roofing is one of those obvious choices because this metal is well-known in history as being incredibly resilient and stunning. The only downside to copper roofing is the fact that it can be quite costly. This expense does keep it from being a truly popular choice to cover an entire roof. However, copper roofing is often used by homeowners or business owners to achieve an accented appearance at specific architectural points on the roof, such as over a porch, over windows, or adjacent to a balcony. 

Visit a site like http://www.economy-roofing.com for more help.


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